Socio-economic level, neighborhood segregation and determinants of reciprocity: Evidence using representative artefactual data from Latin American cities

Arlette Beltran, Alberto Chong, Mariano Montoya

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle in a journalpeer-review

Abstract

We study whether urban segregation is linked to social capital and, in particular, whether socio-economic level, measured by neighborhood of provenance, is detrimental to the formation of reciprocity. We employ representative data for six Latin American cities, an underrepresented region in terms of experimental research. Our main findings provide robust evidence that individuals with higher socio-economic level increasingly reward larger levels of trust in comparison to lower socio-economic level participants.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Economic Policy Reform
DOIs
StateE-pub ahead of print - 23 Aug 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The data are available at https://www .iadb.org/en/about-us/departments/res and come from a broader research effort funded by the Inter-American Development Bank. This section draws from previous research that also describes both this same experimental design as well as the data collection process (Cardenas et al. , and Chong, Rios-Salas, and Nopo ). This is done so that this article can remain self-explanatory.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Keywords

  • Latin America
  • reciprocity
  • Social capital
  • socio-economic level

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